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Thread: Cars

  1. #136
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    For the past 10 years, no one, not even his son, was allowed inside Bob Koepke's home near Titusville, Fla. The retired NASA accountant had been a fixture for many years around the area's hot-rod circuit and swap meets, and had long wrenched on his own vehicles. When he died last November, his son opened his house — and found it occupied, floor to ceiling, with cars and parts.

    After months of pulling vehicles from the weeds and unpacking some four decades of gathering, Bob Koepke's wares will go to auction April 11, and there's a little something for everyone — from the well-preserved 1973 DeTomaso Pantera with 3,800 miles to a bushel of Chevy Tri-Fives and mid-30s Ford coupes in varying states of rust, to hundreds upon hundreds of intakes, carburetors, starters and other parts, including a few built by former friend Smokey Yunick.

    The near-complete car list includes 18 Depression-era Fords, including a few 3-window coupes still in high demand today by hot-rodders, as well as 14 Chevy coupes, wagons and convertibles from 1955-57, along with an unfinished 1958 Corvette project.

    Not all the cars were left outside. In addition to the DeTomaso — which still wears the Goodyear tires it was sold with new — there's an all-original 1958 Porsche 356 that's close to running order, and a 1978 Ferrari 308 that needs a fuel pump and not much else. Among the sea of carbs and intakes lay one wrapped in plastic — a prototype for a big-block version of the Cross Ram intake used on the 302 V-8 in the 1969 Camaro Z28, built by Yunick for General Motors and signed by him on the side.
    To help you remain tranquil in the face of almost certain death, smooth jazz will be deployed, in three, two, one...


  2. #137
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    Elvis had a De Tomaso. He shot it.

    He also had one of these:



    The Stutz Blackhawk. A car that looks like it was designed by a 12 year old who's into classic american cars.
    To every solution there's a problem.
    You can't always tell whether someone is really evil, or just stupid.
    Government: a system put in place to fail, so you don't have to.
    Suicide has a detrimental effect on your health.



    The Ultimate Thunderskull of Astral Terror. For: The greatest gangster-movie ever made. Against: Your sanity.

  3. #138
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    Mr Stirling Moss with his iconic Mercedes 300 SLR at the 2015 Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance

  4. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by !Je$u$! View Post
    Mr Stirling Moss
    SIR Stirling Moss!

    Thereís only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk. Which is water thatís lying about being milk.

  5. #140
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    1974 Leyland



    Australian car.



    Looks kinda weird - right up my alley. Also looks like it would be fun to drive through a desert. Real fast.
    To every solution there's a problem.
    You can't always tell whether someone is really evil, or just stupid.
    Government: a system put in place to fail, so you don't have to.
    Suicide has a detrimental effect on your health.



    The Ultimate Thunderskull of Astral Terror. For: The greatest gangster-movie ever made. Against: Your sanity.

  6. #141
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    Shocking how few people know about this...

  7. #142
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    Quote Originally Posted by the4ten View Post
    Shocking how few people know about this...
    So many people see to think that means "pass me now on the side indicated."

    I did force one guy off the road. He was thinking that very thing. Moron. Got into my blindspot.



    Americans should stop making those ugly SUV's that are no good on or off road, and make these instead. Due to lower center of gravity, you could drive them much faster and have way better handling. And due to awesome size, there's utility to be had.
    To every solution there's a problem.
    You can't always tell whether someone is really evil, or just stupid.
    Government: a system put in place to fail, so you don't have to.
    Suicide has a detrimental effect on your health.



    The Ultimate Thunderskull of Astral Terror. For: The greatest gangster-movie ever made. Against: Your sanity.

  8. #143

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    My car is a 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix SE:

    I inherited it from my Grandmother in the summer of 2012 with just under 43k miles; it now has just under 65k miles. It's got a V6, but it's the 3100 SFI V6 which is notorious for blowing Lower Intake Manifold Gaskets. Thankfully, mine hasn't blown (yet). Its performance isn't exactly exciting either, but part of that is due to the transmission, which is tuned for fuel economy. As a result, you really have to push the accelerator to get it to downshift, and when it finally does, it hesitates a bit. Apparently, this is 100% normal for a GM transmission.

    There's also an unusually high amount of rust for a car that has less than 100k, including a rust hole on both the left and right rocker panels, underneath the back doors. The sad thing is, my GP SE has less rust than most 97-03 GP SE models have! (The GT and GTP models have plastic body molding that hides the rust... until the rust gets so bad that the molding literally falls off).

    I might have sounded a bit harsh, but this is actually a great first car, especially if you're a DIY kind of guy. The interior is very roomy (but very cheap and ugly), the stock speakers are easily the best non-premium-stock speakers I've ever listened to, parts are very cheap and easy to buy, and it's very easy to work on. I've been trying to do more of my own work on my car lately, which helps save me $$. I'll keep driving it 'til it dies or starts costing me too much $$ to maintain.

    Quote Originally Posted by Veran View Post
    Spoiler!
    My dad's second car was a 1970 Fury. He remembers it having the 318 V8, which was "very slow" and, according to one of my dad's older brothers, sounded like "a sewing machine". Personally, I liked the "fuselage" look that Chrysler used on their 1969-1973 cars.

    Quote Originally Posted by FORDboy357 View Post
    Spoiler!
    One of my uncles (my dad's youngest brother) has a '59 Lincoln Continental Mark IV convertible:

    No suicide doors, but it does have a fully powered convertible roof, power windows (including the twist vent windows AND the rear windshield, which can retract independently of the top!), an AM radio with a SEEK function (which would literally move the dial pointer to the next station via a motor!) and an Auto Hi-beam dimmer. It was a very technologically advanced car for its day, plus it featured the biggest V8 from the 1950s: The ford MEL 430 V8, which, in the '59 Mark IV, had an AFB Carter carburetor and made 350hp and 490ft/lbs of torque. After having the privilege of driving that car twice, I can say that despite being 19ft long and weighing over 5000lbs, the car still has a decent "punch" to its acceleration (or at least it feels like it due to all that torque). Steering it is almost as numb and unresponsive as steering a motorboat on a lake, though. It's almost like a really ancient driving simulator with no force-feedback in the steering wheel.

    Ironically, the 58-60 Lincolns were considered the 'black sheep' of Lincolns for many years, mostly because people back then thought the 58-60s were too big, too lavish, and too excessive. That's REALLY saying something, considering how the late 1950s was the age of excess in automobile industry. Thankfully, that stigma has gone away over the years.

    Quote Originally Posted by Veran View Post

    Spoiler!


    While obviously designed using the box-feature in MS paint, that was actually a decent practical design: lots of interior room, very good visibility, and surprizingly good off-road capabilities.

    But then Chrysler decided to spoil it all by having a lethargic 2.2 that sounded like a diesel, and behaved in all ways like half a 4.4 liter V8. And then built the cars from substandard materials without any quality control.

    It was like they wanted everybody to buy japanese.
    Ah, the Plymouth Reliant K aka Dodge Aries K: The boxiest cars ever made, next to the Volvo 740. But unlike Volvos, those cars (and all the other K-cars and their derivatives that Chrysler made) were junk. Yet somehow, the K-cars were able to not only just bring Chrysler out of Bankruptcy several years earlier than expected, they made Chysler thrive in the mid-80s when the K-car was stretched vertically into the Dodge Caravan/Plymouth Voyager.
    The cult of personality of personality that was Lee Iacocca certainly helped, too.
    Also digital dashboards that talked to you:

    Last edited by Teraforce88; 03-29-2015 at 04:41 AM. Reason: Fixed the embedded video

  9. #144
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    Quote Originally Posted by Teraforce88 View Post
    My car is a 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix SE:
    [...] Its performance isn't exactly exciting either, but part of that is due to the transmission, which is tuned for fuel economy. As a result, you really have to push the accelerator to get it to downshift, and when it finally does, it hesitates a bit.
    I just drove a Golf rental, that had a thingumbob tech device, that would turn the engine off when I stopped, and on again when I took my foot off the brake. That one takes a while to even consider beginning to move. It is a second or two, but always feels longer in traffic.

    Once actually going, it moves just fine. Gets great mileage too. Although I'd rather not be around when the starter starts malfunctioning...

    Quote Originally Posted by Teraforce88 View Post
    (The GT and GTP models have plastic body molding that hides the rust... until the rust gets so bad that the molding literally falls off).
    The rule of thumb when you were looking at a Mercedes Benz was, that if you see rust, that's it. The car is ruined. Because they were (probably still are) built with lots of hollow spaces, into with moisture got, but never got out of. And rust happened, from the inside. So, when rust finally manifested itself on the outside, that usually meant the entire body, or vast portions of it, had become brittle.

    My cousin had one once - he put a box of tools in the trunk. Then he drove someplace, and when he looked in the trunk next, gone were the tools, but in their stead was a rather large hole, through which he could see the road.

    That was an early eighties W123.

    Quote Originally Posted by Teraforce88 View Post
    My dad's second car was a 1970 Fury. He remembers it having the 318 V8, which was "very slow" and, according to one of my dad's older brothers, sounded like "a sewing machine".
    Yeah, the american car sound. There's little bits I can't name that are situated on top of the engine under the manifold, and when they get ruinated due to age, this distinct rattling sound manifests itself.

    Very cheap and easy to fix (DIY) in V engines, a complicated mess with inline engines. Better just ignore it and let the thing run its course.

    Quote Originally Posted by Teraforce88 View Post
    Yet somehow, the K-cars were able to not only just bring Chrysler out of Bankruptcy several years earlier than expected, they made Chysler thrive in the mid-80s when the K-car was stretched vertically into the Dodge Caravan/Plymouth Voyager.
    They were very cheap, and real great to drive. The handling way outperformed cars up to twice as expensive.



    Ford Taurus. Cheap old ride of the younger generation. In the USA. Here... not so much. Not common around here, but available. Seem to be OK... sure, bits fall off... they do that. Not bad if you are used to Golf quality.

    Golf: get a new one, it works OK for a year. Maybe. If you're lucky. Then it starts malfunctioning. Random things. You never know. At ~100K all things have broken, and the car works just fine until 200K, then it starts breaking down again, but for the normal regular reasons.
    To every solution there's a problem.
    You can't always tell whether someone is really evil, or just stupid.
    Government: a system put in place to fail, so you don't have to.
    Suicide has a detrimental effect on your health.



    The Ultimate Thunderskull of Astral Terror. For: The greatest gangster-movie ever made. Against: Your sanity.

  10. #145
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    i don't have a picture, but how much would it be to replace a drive belt on a '05 Altima 3.5SE?

    i know i could just go ask a mechanic, but i'm lazy and don't want to go outside today.
    http://www.fanfiction.net/s/9191694/...roken-Sequence

    My Evangelion/Higurashi fanfiction. I was bored. Updates every Tuesday or Wednesday

  11. #146

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    I don't know about the 3.5, but I replaced my buddy's belt on his 2.5 in my driveway in about 30 minutes.

    Had to take the passenger side (right) wheel off along with the inner fender to do it though.
    Last edited by MADEVIL; 03-29-2015 at 10:15 PM.

    Thereís only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk. Which is water thatís lying about being milk.

  12. #147
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    lovely. sounds like a fun project for next weekend.
    http://www.fanfiction.net/s/9191694/...roken-Sequence

    My Evangelion/Higurashi fanfiction. I was bored. Updates every Tuesday or Wednesday

  13. #148

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    Get a serpentine belt tool. It'll make things much easier.

    Thereís only one thing I hate more than lying: skim milk. Which is water thatís lying about being milk.

  14. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by FORDboy357 View Post
    I don't know about the 3.5, but I replaced my buddy's belt on his 2.5 in my driveway in about 30 minutes.

    Had to take the passenger side (right) wheel off along with the inner fender to do it though.
    Still probably a whole lot easier than it would be on my car XD

    "History will remember me as a villian, or it it will remember me as a hero. The opinions won't matter, as long as I'm remembered."

  15. #150
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    Quote Originally Posted by FORDboy357 View Post
    Get a serpentine belt tool. It'll make things much easier.
    where do i get one, and how much will it run me?
    http://www.fanfiction.net/s/9191694/...roken-Sequence

    My Evangelion/Higurashi fanfiction. I was bored. Updates every Tuesday or Wednesday

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